Fight Against Federal Carbon Tax Grows

Saskatchewan and Ontario's premiers, Scott Moe and Doug Ford, announced a partnership to combat the federal plan for a carbon tax, during Council of the Federation talks in New Brunswick.Photo courtesy of Scott Moe/Twitter.

Saskatchewan and Ontario’s premiers, Scott Moe and Doug Ford, announced a partnership to combat the federal plan for a carbon tax, during Council of the Federation talks in New Brunswick.
Photo courtesy of Scott Moe/Twitter.

(SAINT ANDREWS, NB) – Saskatchewan has joined Ontario in the fight against a federal carbon tax. The announcement came during Council of the Federation talks in New Brunswick. The premiers of the two provinces, Scott Moe and Doug Ford, issued a joint announcement.

“We agreed today to join forces and use every single tool at our disposal to challenge the federal government’s authority to arbitrarily impose a carbon tax on the people of Ontario and Saskatchewan,” the release said. “We will do everything in our power, including going to court, to prevent the federal government from imposing this punishing tax on hard-working people.”

Both provincial leaders believe that carbon taxes make “life unaffordable for families” and put the livelihood of thousands of workers at risk.

“This type of taxation does nothing for the environment and hits people in the wallet in order to fund big government initiatives,” the premiers said. “We agreed that, in a time of economic uncertainty, we need to put more money back in the pockets of families and businesses.”

Saskatchewan and Ontario agree that there needs to be a climate change policy, but carbon taxes would result prices increases to “virtually every product and service people need on a daily basis.”

Ford has indicated that Ontario will become an intervening party in the ongoing constitutional reference case Saskatchewan launched April 25, regarding carbon taxes. The western province is asking the Court of Appeal if The Greenhouse Gas Pollution Pricing Act is unconstitutional in whole or in part.

Saskatchewan believes the act is unconstitutional since it imposes a carbon tax on some jurisdictions, but not others, based on what each province is doing about climate change.

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Ian Shalapata
Ian Shalapata is the owner and publisher of Square Media Group. He covers politics, the police beat, community events, the arts, sports, and everything in between. His imagery and freelance contributions have appeared in select publications and for organizations in Canada and the United States. Contact Ian with story ideas.